Vertical or Horizontal.

 (Patrick Kriner)

Vertical or Horizontal.  Back in my days of teaching photography at the University, many of my students asked questions about format.  Should it be a vertical image or a horizontal image?  Clearly, the answer rests with the image itself.  Which format best suits the image and the story that you are trying to tell with your photography.  Some images are quite clear while others can be a bit confusing.  So when do you use a vertical format?  Right after you shoot a horizontal one.  In today’s world of digital photography, the cost of repeated shutter clicks is practically nothing if not zero.  So shoot away and then take a look at the image on your computer screen.  Compare the vertical image to the horizontal image and then select the one that makes more sense.  Or, in some cases, post both to your portfolio.  Here is an example.  The above image was captured while on my recent trip to the Palouse region on the Eastern border between Washington state and Idaho.  The blue skies with clouds in the background along with the rolling hills of the Palouse make this a very nice photograph.

 (Patrick Kriner)This next image is the same barn only using a vertical format.  A bit different, but a quality image just the same.This image allows me to bring the flowers into the lower portion of the image creating a more interesting foreground to the photograph.  I can still see the sky and rolling hills in the background.  In this case, I like both vertical and horizontal images.  Every picture making opportunity is not as clear cut as this one.  So practice and experience in the field will help you create better and better images as you develop your own vision for your photographic endeavors.  Enjoy!

 



Palouse

 (Patrick Kriner)

Palouse!  I have recently returned from a trip to Washington State where a small group of photographers travelled throughout the Palouse region along the Palouse Scenic Byway.  Our focus was capturing images of landscapes and other features surrounding the farm country here in the North West.  Although we had to deal with a few weather related issues, the overall trip was great and many images were captured.  The above image shows a nice looking barn nestled among the rolling hills of the Palouse.  As you can see, we were dealing with some rain this day and although it kept us from shooting in the morning, the overcast skies allowed for some early afternoon photography which enhanced the landscape.  This image was captured with my Nikon D810 and Nikon’s 24-70 wide angle zoom lens.  I always use a tripod for stability in these cases and my trusty Gitzo tripod and my Ball Head from Really Right Stuff provided me with the support I needed to capture this photograph.  Many of the photographers I meet along the way are gear heads and try to one up everyone with the equipment they use.  I like to think that the equipment we use are only the tools of our craft and it is our vision and expertise in the fields that creates a long lasting memory of a special moment in time.  So I bristle a little when someone sees an image of mine and says to me, “Boy, you must have a really nice camera.”  Watch for more of these images in the next few weeks and share them on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.  Enjoy!



Palouse Finally!

 (Patrick Kriner)

Palouse Finally!  Early in the afternoon here in the Palouse region located on the East edge of Washington State, the skies opened up and the light began to dance across the rolling hills here in farm country.  On our way up to Steptoe Butte, we stopped on a little pull out for our cars and found this piece of landscape just waiting for us to have a look.  It was clear from the foot prints that we were not the only photographers to find this location.  We spent a few minutes capturing a few images.  This Photograph shows you some of the contours and shadows that have attracted photographers here to the Palouse.  In the background you can see the many wind turbines that are scattered across the hillside.  A distraction, or a part of the story that needs to be told about life here in this farming community in the great state of Washington.  More to come.  Remember, you can share this photo on Facebook, pin it on Pinterest, give it a +1 on Google and share it on Twitter.  Enjoy!



Vintage Chevy

 (Patrick Kriner)

Vintage Chevy!  I am in the Palouse region of Washington State with the focus on landscapes.  Rolling hills, farms, barns, and various other photographic pursuits.  This morning we got up at 0 Dark 30 to capture the sunrise over Steptoe Butte.  What we found was an overcast sky and an occasional peak at the morning sun.  Such is the life of a nature and wildlife photographer.  When Mother  nature decides to give you lemons, you need to find a way to make lemonade.  So we drove along the countryside hoping for a better opportunity to get out the gear.   We came upon this vintage Chevy sitting alongside of the road and thought we would give it a quick look.  The sun peeked out a few times and allow for a little shooting time.

Back in the hotel and hoping for better weather, I took the time to create a little High Dynamic Range magic and processed this image with a little help from MacPhun’s Aurora HDR software.  If you are interested, the truck had a for sale sign stating $900 or best offer.  We decided to pass.  Watch for more hopeful posts here from the Palouse region where I will be until this Sunday.  Enjoy!



Bear Book Project

 (Patrick Kriner)

I have just uploaded the majority of my images from my Coastal Brown Bear Book project here on my website.  Click on the home button in the above menu and you will see a link to the images on the lower left hand side of the Home Page.  Take a look at over 35 images of bears from Lake Clark National Park.  It has been a real challenge in putting the right images together for this project.  Selecting the right images, not just the best images, for this book has been a real effort in critiquing my own work.  Often times I have been asked to submit a portfolio of my work for a show or contest and find that I am more critical of my work than other people might be.  So I am on my way to building the finished product and hope to get it to the publisher soon.  Until then, have a look and let me know what you think.  Enjoy!



Another Brown Bear Photograph

 (Patrick Kriner)

I am continuing with my layouts for the Brown Bear Book Project.  This is another image that made its way into the book.  I like the lighting best of all.  This was an early morning shoot along the edge of the Johnson River located in the National Park where we photographed Coastal Brown Bears in Alaska.  When photographing anything that is in the water, whether that is an animal or even people, always give them room to show their virtual feet.  When you crop the image too tight and give the aspect that you have cut off their feet, even though you cannot see them in the water, you leave the viewer wondering what they are standing in.  My goal as a photographer is to illustrate what the image was that I captured with a click of the shutter and lay it out so the viewer can see for themselves what I was looking at without me being there to tell the story.  Each of my images has a story to tell, and my challenge is to tell it through the images themselves.  Remember to check out more of these images in my Brown Bear Book Project gallery located on the home page of my website.  Just click on the Home button on top of this post and locate the gallery images in the lower left side of the page.  Check in with me on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Google+.  Enjoy!



Coastal Brown Bear Book Project

Here is a recent Video I posted on Facebook talking about my Coastal Brown Bear project.  If you have been following my Blog here at New Dawn Photography, then you know all about this new and exciting project I have started.  I have selected over 45 of my Grizzly Bear images for use in the book and will be posting a few as I prepare the book for publication.  This book will be about 11 inches by 8 inches and will have a leather cover and Dust Jacket.  It is designed as a Coffee table book and will look great as part of your home collection.  Whether you place it on the table in the living room or on the desk in the den, This book will serve to compliment any of your home or office decorations.  Watch the blog and visit the Gallery as I push to complete the book in the next several weeks.  Until then, follow me on Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, Google, or check back in here on occasion.  Just click on the Video and hear about this exciting new project.  Enjoy!



Sedgeing Bear

 (Patrick Kriner)Sedgeing Bear!  I am enjoying some quiet time here in Northwest Ohio as we had about 7 inches of snow deposited yesterday morning.  As I have said in my previous post, I am trying out Macphun’s new software package for Photoshop called Creative CK.  I have been revisiting my bear photos in preparation for publishing a book for images from my many trips to Alaska and the Lake Clark National Park.  In this image, a Bear is sedgeing or eating sedge grass.  Coastal Brown bears eat grass and berries as their mainstay of nutriton up to a point in mid to late August when they switch to consuming the many fish that they can find along the coastal waters of the Cook Inlet in Alaska.  Inland Brown Bears do not weigh as much as their brethren along the coast because they do not have the protein available to them from the fish consumed by the coastal brown bears.  The difference is quite considerable making the coastal bears a lot more formidable.  Getting up close and personal with these animals is quite thrilling to say the least.  More to com, Enjoy!



Alaskan Bear Book Creation

 (Patrick Kriner)

I have Started a new project with my Bear photography.  I am in the planning stages for a new Coffee Table Book about my adventures to Lake Clark National Park in Alaska.  It is Lake Clark where we find the Coastal Brown Bears that I have photographed over several years.  In addition, I have acquired a new Plug In collection for my post processing work in Photoshop and I am trying it out for the first time.  I have had quite a bit of fun revisiting these older images and using the newer techniques for post processing of the images.  Keep en eye out on my Facebook page and on Instagram as I start to post some of these dynamic images that will make their way into this new book project.  As always, you can like these images on Facebook and Instagram, give them a +1 on Google +, Pin it on Pinterest, or follow me over at Linked In.  Enjoy!



Bear in the Woods

 (Patrick Kriner)I was updating some files this weekend and found a few gems that I had never posted in the past.  Some of these brought some great memories and exciting times.  This image made me think of my friend Paul Burwell who recently passed away in Edmonton, Alberta.  One of Paul’s favorite place to shoot was a game preserve in Montana.  A group of us were there in 2008 to photograph some of their animals in a the snow.  We had been capturing images of this little fellow as he romped around the wooded area in the hills surrounding Kalispell, Montana.  Suddenly, he turned and charged the group of us lined up with our tripods and camera gear.  Our guide was quick to react and sprayed the bear with a shot of water.  A little shocked by getting hit in the snout with water, he was not swayed in his efforts to get to us.  Our guide was presented with no choice but to switch to bear spray and gave him a shot.  The bear retreated into the trees and no longer was challenging us.  Unfortunately, some of us were down wind of the guide and the bear and had ourselves our first experience with pepper spray.  Noses were running, throats were tightening up and our eyes were tearing up quite fast.  Paul was the first one to mention that placing yourself downwind from the guide was not always in everyone’s best interest.

I recently expanded my presence on Instagram. I have posted this image and will continue to pst more each and every week.  Follow me on Instagram as Patrick_Kriner.  Enjoy!